Wildflower of the Month

Knapweed

Common Knapweed, also known as Hardheads or Black Knapweed, is one of the most hardy wildflowers found in Scotland. Its flowers can be seen all through summer and into September. Although it looks a little thistle-like, this plant has no prickles, and can be identified by its blackish spherical base of the flower head. Its […]

Common Mallow

Common Mallow is a beautiful wildflower from the mallow family. Known as Mauve in France, it is where the word for the colour comes from. The original “marshmallows” were made using the roots of mallows, and were used to treat coughs and chest infections. Due to their high mucilage content the roots were also used […]

Red Campion

Red Campion can grow up to 1m tall, and is an ancient woodland indicator. You can often find Red Campion growing alongside White Campion, and the two can hybridise to form pinky-white flowers. It is dioecious, which means that the male and female flowers grow on separate plants. The female flowers produce a frothy foam which gives […]

Ribwort Plantain

  Ribwort Plantain is one of the most widely found wildflowers in the country, and has been around since prehistoric times. It has long leaves with five to seven deep veins along them. It flowers from April to October, is perfect for pollinators as it provides a rich nectar, and the seeds provide food for […]

Few-flowered Leek

  You may have spotted (and smelled!) this plant covering certain areas of Easter Craiglockhart Hill recently. With long, thin leaves, drooping white flowers, and distinctive onion smell, Few-flowered Leek is often mistaken for Wild Garlic, but this edible plant is actually a non-native invasive species. It begins growing in March, and grows so rapidly […]